“Thousand Person Stitches” Installation 2018   Digital Garage US Inc.  at  717 Market Street, San Francisco , CA   The Senninbari Project  is working to help rebuild lives. Senninbari means “Thousand Person Stitches”.
       
     
 After the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that devastated part of her home region,  Maki Aizawa  and her mother, Tsuyo Onodera, created a project to bring together women who had lost everything and teach them sewing skills so they could have a source of income, but even more importantly a connection with others.
       
     
 For this installation, artist Maki Aizawa searched for a way to illustrate the traditional Japanese belief that a fabric sewn by many people becomes an amulet, protecting the wearer from danger and clothing them in prayers.
       
     
 This installation is constructed with one hundred and eight pieces of handmade Kozo paper, which was hand-stitched with silk weaving thread by thirty-five Tohoku women.
       
     
 Under the canopy of this ethereal concept of protection, Maki will be presenting programs, open to the public, covering a wide range of Japanese arts, such as shodo calligraphy, chanoyu tea ceremony, ikebana, Sachiko embroidery, Furoshiki gift wrapping and Koto musical demonstrations.
       
     
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  “Thousand Person Stitches” Installation 2018   Digital Garage US Inc.  at  717 Market Street, San Francisco , CA   The Senninbari Project  is working to help rebuild lives. Senninbari means “Thousand Person Stitches”.
       
     

“Thousand Person Stitches” Installation 2018 Digital Garage US Inc. at 717 Market Street, San Francisco, CA

The Senninbari Project is working to help rebuild lives. Senninbari means “Thousand Person Stitches”.

 After the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that devastated part of her home region,  Maki Aizawa  and her mother, Tsuyo Onodera, created a project to bring together women who had lost everything and teach them sewing skills so they could have a source of income, but even more importantly a connection with others.
       
     

After the 2011 earthquake and tsunami that devastated part of her home region, Maki Aizawa and her mother, Tsuyo Onodera, created a project to bring together women who had lost everything and teach them sewing skills so they could have a source of income, but even more importantly a connection with others.

 For this installation, artist Maki Aizawa searched for a way to illustrate the traditional Japanese belief that a fabric sewn by many people becomes an amulet, protecting the wearer from danger and clothing them in prayers.
       
     

For this installation, artist Maki Aizawa searched for a way to illustrate the traditional Japanese belief that a fabric sewn by many people becomes an amulet, protecting the wearer from danger and clothing them in prayers.

 This installation is constructed with one hundred and eight pieces of handmade Kozo paper, which was hand-stitched with silk weaving thread by thirty-five Tohoku women.
       
     

This installation is constructed with one hundred and eight pieces of handmade Kozo paper, which was hand-stitched with silk weaving thread by thirty-five Tohoku women.

 Under the canopy of this ethereal concept of protection, Maki will be presenting programs, open to the public, covering a wide range of Japanese arts, such as shodo calligraphy, chanoyu tea ceremony, ikebana, Sachiko embroidery, Furoshiki gift wrapping and Koto musical demonstrations.
       
     

Under the canopy of this ethereal concept of protection, Maki will be presenting programs, open to the public, covering a wide range of Japanese arts, such as shodo calligraphy, chanoyu tea ceremony, ikebana, Sachiko embroidery, Furoshiki gift wrapping and Koto musical demonstrations.

IMG_E1194.jpg
       
     
IMG_E1214.jpg
       
     
IMG_1198.jpg